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Author Topic: Why is it?  (Read 2778 times)

Offline TrainFreak1994

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Why is it?
« on: August 02, 2014, 01:16:48 AM »
So whenever I go on RR Picture Archives, I see that SP is under the category of 'major carriers', but CNW also another major carrier is under fallen flags. Is it because the CNW was taken over outright when UP bought all of it's shares? I also saw that UP purchased them for 1.1 billion making it more of a merger than an acquisition. Also could the SP/UP merger gone either way? After all, the UP was merger into the corporate structure of that of the SP and was NOT put down on paper as the surviving company, although soon after it was announced UP for "all railroad operations." I'm just curious as to why.

Offline jadebullet

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Re: Why is it?
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2014, 10:35:57 PM »
Probably just a misprint. B&M is still under a regional carrier.

In any case, UP is technically SP which is technically DRGW. UP just had a more well known name so they went with that as the surviving name even though DRGW(renamed SP in the merger for the same reason) was more in charge of the merger.

Offline TrainFreak1994

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Re: Why is it?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2014, 11:28:54 PM »
Probably just a misprint. B&M is still under a regional carrier.

In any case, UP is technically SP which is technically DRGW. UP just had a more well known name so they went with that as the surviving name even though DRGW(renamed SP in the merger for the same reason) was more in charge of the merger.

I thought the SP was better known.

Offline n8phu

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Re: Why is it?
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2014, 03:14:03 AM »
The D&RGW (D&RGW parent Rio Grande Industries) bought the SP and kept the SP branding because the SP name was more well known and carried more weight in the industry.

UP bought out Rio Grande Industries and folded the SP into the UP.

From Wikipedia, take with a grain of salt:

"By the 1980s route mileage had dropped to 10,423 miles (16,774 km), mainly due to the pruning of branch lines. In 1988 the Southern Pacific was taken over by D&RGW parent Rio Grande Industries. The combined railroad kept the Southern Pacific name due to its brand recognition in the railroad industry and with customers of both constituent railroads. Along with the addition of the SPCSL Corporation route from Chicago to St. Louis, the total length of the D&RGW/SP/SSW system was 15,959 miles (25,684 km).

By 1996 years of financial problems had dropped SP's mileage to 13,715 miles (22,072 km), and it was taken over by the Union Pacific Railroad."
Chris N8PHU



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Offline NS_37

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Re: Why is it?
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2014, 01:49:01 AM »
Although Union Pacific was the dominant company, taking complete control of SP, its corporate structure was merged into Southern Pacific, which on paper became the "surviving company"; which then changed its name to Union Pacific. The merged company retains the name "Union Pacific" for all railroad operations.


Offline n8phu

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Re: Why is it?
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2014, 03:12:59 AM »
Cool..

Take a bunch of railroad companies and throw them in a mixer.... can't keep the players straight without a program.
Chris N8PHU



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